How Wealth RULES the World

HowWealth

This is worth the read!

Price’s invaluable work makes clear that not all forms of property are the same: some require fundamental legal protections, others are legally protected only because those of immense wealth and power make us think they should be. If we have any hope of creating authentic democracy (not recreating because we’ve never had at any time) in this country and beyond and protecting the ecosystem from corporate plunder, we must quickly move to the other side of the learning curve about property and how “property rights” have come to trump human and community rights and the rights of human beings to our livable habitat.

“How Wealth Rules the World” is both historical and contemporary; descriptive and prescriptive. It describes how the privileged transformed the best affirmations of the Declaration of Independence into a self-serving Constitution. The Contracts and Commerce Clauses have gutted the ability of local self rule. Numerous Constitutional Amendments that were intended to apply solely to human beings have been expanded to include the the rights of property to ensure that property owners forever expand their power and profit as they plunder abroad and increasingly in our communities.
Local laws promoting justice, sustainability and democracy are legally increasingly preempted by the state, state laws by the federal government and increasingly federal laws by mis-named international “trade” deals that are more about corporate rule than free or fair trade.

The prescription, as presented, is people organizing collectively to protect the most basic place that they readily identify — their community. The growing “community rights” movement that seeks to legalize democracy where they live is an extremely important strategy to not only resist the property right onslaught, but maybe more importantly lift up as a tangible alternative to the centralization and privatization of decision-making that is more real, inclusive and ultimately sustainable.

While no one movement is by itself the solution to the multitude of systemic crises we face, it’s one of the more important ones. Reading the book will help one much more understand how we got into our legal and constitutional fix, and a route out of it.

Testimony at Democracy Day Public Hearing

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Greg Coleridge / February 26, 2019 / Brecksville, Ohio

Happy Democracy Day! Congratulations once more to the citizens of Brecksville for voting for a ballot initiative in 2012 calling on Congress to pass a Constitutional Amendment to end corporate rule and big money in elections by declaring that corporations don’t have constitutional rights and money spent in elections is not equal to political free speech.

Big problems require big solutions. The amendment is a big solution.

While much deserving attention tonight will be devoted to one piece of this proposed amendment – the impact of money in elections from the super wealthy and corporate entities, it’s not the only fundamental problem this amendment would fundamentally solve. The other problem is corporate rule or governance. Ending all corporate constitutional rights goes beyond corporate influence in elections to corporate power in direct rule making.

Inalienable rights apply to human beings. The Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment affirmed certain rights to human persons, not to corporations.

Corporations aren’t mentioned in the Constitution. Originally, they came into existence when sovereign state legislatures granted charters one at a time with clearly defined functions. Corporate charters were democratic instruments. No voter, citizen, social movement or elected official has ever granted corporations constitutional rights. Rather, it’s been activist Supreme Court Justices taking their cues time and again from corporate attorneys.

So, what’s been the impact of the corporate hijack of the Constitution? It’s been lethal on people, communities and our democratic republic.

Corporations have hijacked 1st Amendment “free speech” rights beyond the right to donate to political elections. The never intended corporate 1st amendment right NOT to speak has, for example, preempted passed laws informing consumers whether or not toxins are in their food. Never intended corporate 1st amendment “religious” rights have prevented women employees from receiving health care coverage because it violated the religious right of the business corporation – not the owners — but the corporation.

Corporations have hijacked 4th Amendment “search on seizure” rights. The courts have overturned democratically enacted laws and regulations requiring mandatory inspections of corporate property to ensure worker safety or environmental protections. Corporate rights have preempted these community rights to protect workers and the environment.

Corporations have hijacked 5th Amendment “takings” rights. Courts have overturned regulations ensuring the protection of homes, land and communities from a corporate action – claiming that regulations are “takings” and must be compensated. Thus, corporate property rights have preempted personal property rights.

Corporate have hijacked the 14th Amendment due process and equal protection rights – rights that were intended to apply at the end of the civil war solely to freed slaves. Laws passed by local communities that, for example, support local businesses that keep jobs and money recycling in the community over mega chain stores have been overturned by courts as “discriminatory” under the 14th Amendment.

And corporations have hijacked the Constitution’s Commerce Clause. The power of local public officials to protect the health, safety and welfare of residents and the community have by the scores been preempted by corporations claiming that, for instance, toxic waste is commerce and therefore legally permissible to be dumped in a community’s backyard. Efforts by farmers and rural communities in many states against agribusinesses or initiatives that mandate only those who farm the land can own the land have been overturned by the courts as a violation of the Commerce Clause in favor of corporations.

Systemic problems require systemic solutions.

Yet, paradoxically, this amendment is extremely conservative because it advocates returning to a system where questions of money in elections and the relationship between corporations and people are no longer decided in the judicial arena (the courts) but are shifted back to the legislative arena – where they once were decided — where We the People have greater power.

It’s no wonder small businesses, family farmers, and local public officials support this amendment and why citizens across the country who have had a chance to vote on these initiatives like you did in Brecksville vote yes – by the hundreds – because it promotes the fundamental democratic right to decide.

Passing a constitutional amendment that not only ends political money defined as free speech but also ends all constitutional rights will help create real democracy. Awareness is spreading, as is the support because our rising fundamental problems require people to rise up for fundamental change.

It’s nice to have a Democracy Day. But I’m for — and I hope you are as well — real democracy year round.

Thank you.